EnergyLogic is in the news, helping to support the importance of the ENERGY STAR® program

EnergyLogic was happy to participate in Grace Hood’s Story on the importance of the ENERGY STAR® program. Grace Hood is an Energy and Environment Reporter with Colorado Public Radio. ENERGY STAR is on the list of 49 programs proposed to be cut within the Environmental Protection Agency.

Want An Efficient Colorado Home? The Program That Certifies That May Face Cuts

Denver is ground zero for Colorado’s construction boom, especially when it comes to building to accommodate a swelling population. In a North Denver development called Midtown, construction workers are still putting finishing touches on Energy Star-rated homes, a program that’s existed since 1995.

There’s many elements invisible to most people: special building materials and features help these new homes achieve up to 30 percent energy savings. Steve Eagleburger, who works for an independent company named EnergyLogic, is someone who reviews and certifies some of those unseen elements. Today, he’s checking a home to make sure the attic is insulated.

“This one is not insulated at all,” Eagleburger notes before moving on to the next thing — a checklist of dozens of items.

EnergyLogic CEO Steve Byers said this home won’t get the Energy Star seal of approval until the builder fixes the insulation and any other issues his company has flagged.

“The Energy Star brand has brand recognition on par with Coke and Pepsi,” said Byers said. “This is a very successful program. I don’t know what more one could want out of a government program.”

Read the full Colorado Public Radio story here

EnergyLogic Tech Bulletins

EnergyLogic crafts many Tech Bulletins on a variety of subjects to help educate our clients while ensuring that we are all on the same page regarding what is required by a program or a code.

Our Tech Bulletin’s topics range from ventilation to insulation, from fan ducting installation to warm/conditioned crawl space design, and more. Most topics we cover come from questions you ask that need added research and understanding. If necessary, plan sets or scope-of-work documents may be created to address further details for each topic.

Our tech bulletin on bath fan installation is a good example of a topic that initially came from a question that needed a better building science perspective. In consideration of ENERGY STAR® best practices, as well as specific building codes, we are measuring the flow through bath fans more often.

Other Tech Bulletin topics that might be of interest to you can be found on the EnergyLogic Blog. Below you will find a few relevant post links for reference:

Whole-House Ventilation Strategy

Vent caps and fan flow

Training resources to help reduce re-inspections

If you have a topic or situation that you think needs a better-applied building science perspective, please let us know and we will do our best to research your question and get a new Tech Bulletin on the subject.

 

Robby Schwarz (faked)

Who to Contact:

Robby Schwarz
Principal, Director of Builder Relations

Email Robby
720-838-0677

 

New Home Builder Rebates are increasing, in a good way!

New rebate structure update and highlights of the Xcel Energy ENERGY STAR® New Homes Program 2016 accomplishments.

Total year-end program results from 2016:

  • 5,300 total completed houses
  • 145,835 net Dekatherms and 4,957,801 net kilowatt-hours in energy savings
  • $3,361,890 in builder rebates and energy rater administrative fees
  • 1,800 earned the $100 ENERGY STAR rebate

Program and Rebate Changes for 2017/18, effective for homes submitted after March 1st:

  • Homes will qualify for rebates based on the percent improvement better than the local adopted IECC code
  • Rebate levels are increased for homes built in jurisdictions where IECC 2012 and newer codes are enforced
  • The $10 ENERGY STAR dishwasher rebate is discontinued and the clothes washer rebate is reduced from $50 to $30
  • The High Efficiency Lighting rebate is unchanged for homes built in jurisdictions where IECC 2009 and older codes are enforced
  • For homes built in jurisdictions where IECC 2012 and newer codes are enforced, a $10 rebate is available if 100% of lighting is CFL or LED fixtures and/or bulbs
Percent Better Than Local Code Improvement Builder Rebate – IECC 2009 and older Builder Rebate – IECC 2012 and newer
10.0 – 14.999% $200 $250
15.0 – 19.999% $350 $400
20.0 – 24.999% $500 $600
25.0 – 29.999% $650 $900
30.0 – 34.999% $800 $1,300
35.0 – 39.999% $1,000 $2,000
40% and higher $1,400 $2,550

 

Appliance/Lamp Builder Rebate – IECC 2009 & older Builder Rebate – IECC 2012 & newer
Refrigerator $10 $10
Clothes Washer $30 $30
Lighting Efficiency (CFL or LED) $20 (20+ qualifying bulbs) $10 (100% qualifying bulbs)
ENERGY STAR®, Xcel Gas & Electric $100 $100

Tracy Larson

 

Who to Contact:

Tracy Larson
Logistics/Customer Support Supervisor

Email Tracy
970-556-6491

Energy Logic – All Homes Will Be Energy Efficient

all-homes-will-be-energy-efficient-robbyschwarz

EnergyLogic is in the news! Check out this interview with Robby Schwarz, one of the founders and continuing principals here at EnergyLogic. You’ll find the article supporting how EnergyLogic continues to help builders, salespeople, and consumers in our industry better understand the long-term benefits that energy efficiency will bring to their lives.

To access the article, please click on the link below:

Northern Colorado ENERGY STAR® Article

 

Robby Schwarz

 

Who to Contact:
Robby Schwarz
Principal, Director of Builder Relations

Email Robby
720-838-0677

HERS® Energy Rating Index Scores are Going Up!

In July of 2015, EnergyLogic began informing you about upcoming software changes.  As a reminder, the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) began to align the energy rating reference home to the 2006 IECC almost two years ago.  The reference home, which currently reflects the 2004 IECC supplemental code, is what your home is compared to in order to create the HERS Index score.  RESNET has gone through a process of taking the rule set for how to develop the HERS Index score through the ANSI process in order to create the ANSI/RESNET/ICC 301-2014 Standard for the Calculation and Labeling of the Energy Performance of Low-Rise Residential Buildings using an Energy Rating Index.  The main impetus for this ANSI Standard arose from the desire to use the Index Score for code compliance and the adoption of the Energy Rating Index (ERI), a HERS path, as a compliance matrix for the 2015 IECC.

Effects

The alignment with the 2006 IECC has three primary effects on the HERS reference home.

  • First, the updated 2006 IECC reference home infiltration rate became tighter to better reflect the improved tightness levels of newly constructed homes.
  • Second, the updated 2006 IECC reference home window solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) went from 0.55 in climate zones 4 through 8 to a SHGC of 0.40 in those climate zones. This updated value reflects the market penetration of improvements in basic window technology and is in alignment with the 2006 IECC.
  • Lastly, revised mechanical ventilation requirements are used in the HERS reference home which are now aligned with the ASHRAE 62.2-2013 ventilation standard.

Scores to Increase by 2 to 6 Points

Philip Fairey, Deputy Director of the Florida Solar Energy Center and a consultant for RESNET, performed research on the impact of these changes on the HERS Index values of rated homes in all eight climate zones. His research has demonstrated that the HERS Index values will increase across all climate zones by a range of 2 to 6 points due to the reference home alignment with the 2006 IECC that occurred through the creation of the ANSI/RESNET 301-2014 Standard.  EnergyLogic has been working with the newly released software, and we are seeing results that are consistently on the high end of the range (3-8 HERS Index points) when comparing homes that were rated with software developed prior to the ANSI standard adoption.  RESNET is mandating that HERS providers begin using the new software on January 1, 2017.  EnergyLogic has worked with RESNET to find ways to reduce the impact of the implementation of the ANSI standard software. A few things are, or have been, changed but the impact of the score increase will remain significant, affecting every home across the country.

Incorporating Water Heating

The development of the ANSI standard has also given RESNET the opportunity to include additional features related to water heating.  This is specific to energy use related to hot water distribution and does not take into account water conservation.  RESNET is working on a Water Index score that will address water conservation. The ANSI standard addendum allows the HERS Index score to quantify the efficiency or loss of energy through; pipe runs from the water heater to the farthest fixture, hot water pipes that are insulated, on-demand recirculation systems, high-efficiency low flow fixtures, and drain water heat recovery systems.  If all of these systems are deployed in a home, the technologies can provide builders approximately 1-3 point reduction in the HERS Index.

It is important to also understand that if a builder is currently utilizing a water delivery system that is not delivering the hot water efficiently then the HERS Index would be penalized.  For example, if you are currently using a timer or continuous recirculation loop to deliver hot water, your home’s HERS Index will be penalized. This will result in a higher score than the normal transition to the ANSI approved software.  So, in this example, if the transitioning to the ANSI approved software took a HERS Index from 60 to 65, the inefficient hot water circulation system could add another 5-10 points, taking the score to 70 or 75. It is important to evaluate your current specifications and choose the most efficient water distribution systems, such as an on-demand hot water recirculation system, or stop installing them all together.

Summary: All Homes will Be Affected

These changes will affect every home that is rated but should have minimal impact on the use of the Index score for demonstrating compliance with programs such as EnergyStar, as the program’s energy Index target will fluctuate in unison with the home that is being rated. In the same way, these changes should have minimal effects on code compliance when utilizing the Simulated Performance path as the code reference home is separate from the HERS reference home. For those few builders utilizing the 2015 IECC Energy Rating Index path (ERI), these changes will be significant.  Lastly, builders utilizing the Index score in their marketing efforts will need to update HERS related marketing collaterals.

Robby Schwarz (faked)

 

Robby Schwarz

Principal / Director of Builder Relations

EnergyLogic, Inc.

720-838-0677

Contact Robby Schwarz